Words of Color/ Coloring Words: A Workshop with Reut Shahar and Judy Labensohn Thursday October 27, 10 AM – 4 PM, Moshav Zafririm (near Beit Shemesh)

So much depends/ upon/ a red wheel barrow . . .

How does a writer relate to color?  How does a painter relate to words? In this multi-disciplinary workshop, Reut Shahar, artist, and Judy Labensohn, writer, will enable participants to explore the relationship between primary colors and primal words. We will read poems and passages about colors for inspiration, paint with Shahar’s special paints developed for wood and write the colors that have defined major moments in our lives.
Towards the end of the workshop we will experiment with mixing words and colors and sharing these creations with the group, possibly even creating a group piece of work. A day of creativity in Shahar’s studio, saturated with the smells and greenery of the Adullam forest, promises to be a meaningful and colorful way to start the new year.
This workshop is suitable for anyone who wants to play with words and color.
BioReut Shahar is a sculptress, designer and singer. She is the co-founder and artistic director of Kakadu, where she creates and designs an entire language of hand-painted wooden objects and household items. The thirty-year old company is internationally-known. As a performer and sculptor, Shahar has performed and exhibited in galleries and museums in Israel and around the world. She sings and composes music and lyrics, plays several instruments and recently produced a CD, “Tamid.”  In Israel Shahar leads workshops on piyutim, ancient liturgical poems, and at her studio in Moshav Zafririm, she leads the popular workshop Everyone Is Born an Artist.
Judy Labensohn is the founder of The Writing Pad. She has been teaching creative writing and mentoring Anglo adults in Israel for more than twenty years. Her writing has appeared in The Kenyon Review, Moment Magazine, Lilith Magazine, and Creative Nonfiction, among others. For fifteen years she wrote a personal essay column for The Jerusalem Post. Her essay “Leaving Babylon: A Walk through the Get Ceremony,” has been anthologized in college textbooks. Lately, she has taken up hairdressing and will be delighted to cut your hair at Just Cuts, her little shrine in her home in Tel Aviv.
Maximum number of participants: 16
Cost:  NIS 430 - includes all art materials, tea and coffee, snacks and light lunch.
Registration: Email judylabensohn@gmail.com that you are interested and let me know how many places you wish to reserve. When you receive the OK, send a check made out to Judy Labensohn to Rehov Beeri 53, Apt. 5, Tel Aviv-Yafo, 6423319.
Location: Reut Shahar’s Studio is on the northeast edge of  Moshav Zafririm, in Park Adullam, south of Beit Shemesh. Use Waze for getting there by car or take a train to Beit Shemesh and then a cab, which we can help coordinate.
Cancellation Policy: Cancelling within a week of the workshop will necessitate forfeiting the full cost if your place cannot be filled.
Start the new year with a blast of color.
. . .glazed with rain/ water/ beside the white/ chickens.
                                                               William Carlos Williams


Five Ways Living in One Language Affects Your Writing in Another

By Gila Green 

  1. Diction. Slang and other everyday words sneak into our vocabularies. If you don’t live and write in the same language, it takes an extra effort to root out unintended foreign words from your work.
  2. Names. Many writers spend time enhancing their work with thoughtful character names. But when you live in one language and write in another naming story characters can be frustrating. Names from your adopted country often seem awkward in your mother tongue, or worse become words that take the reader out of the story. On the other hand, mother tongue names may appear mundane.
  3. Setting. If you choose to write about your adopted country, it may appear too exotic or you may worry you lack the background to make the country come alive. How long do you have to live somewhere to feel you have the authority to write about it, especially if the country operates in a language that is not your own? And if you choose to write about your birthplace, what if your notions are outdated? Are you destined to depict your birthplace only in the past?
  4. Humor. Because humor is cultural, anything you satirize or depict as humorous can throw you off balance. Will a funny everyday experience in one language be understood in the language you use for your writing?
  5. Layers. There are layers and depth to your work that can only come from the experience of complete ‘otherness.’ True, not everyone will grasp your meaning, but the sense of being the ‘other’ allows you to see both your native culture and adopted culture with a broad lens; a powerful tool for any writer.  
What do you think? Are you living in one language and writing in another? 
Preparation for Traveling concept and to do list, paper noted, airplane, photo frame, ear phone, pencil, passport on vintage wooden background.